Tag Archives: magnification

Today we had a beautiful sunny day, so time to go outside and try my new MPE 65mm. And it was hard work. First I thought that all the reviews on the internet were a bit exaggerated, when the spoke of a difficult lens, but it was all true. And I loved it. I can’t say that I have a great result from the beginning, but hey it’s a start. And it looks very promising. I can’t wait to start this journey. I tried some insects but I’m not experienced enough with this lens at the moment to get the results I’m aiming for. So I tried this little screw which is only 10mm long, and I was surprised by the result. This is only a 1x magnification. I also tried the larger magnifications but they were out of focus. Next was this violet. The photo shown here is a stack of 7 photos. (DOF Stack, I will explain more about that in a later article.) I stacked the image with a program CombineZP. In short; what such a program does is combine several images with a different focus point so that the final image has a wider DOF. With this lens set on 5x magnification you only have a DOF of 0.048mm at f/2.8 and 0.269mm at f/16. So that is not a lot. So you take several shots in which the focus point shifts by 0.25mm (if lens is set at 5x f/16) and CombineZP merges these images into one. The last pictures show a Woodlouse. The picture on the left is a handmade stack (I used Adobe Photoshop) out of the two photos on the right. When I shot these I did not had the intension to make stack, so I had to pull some tricks out […]

Just came back from the shop and bought a MP-E 65mm f/2.8 1-5x Macro lens from Canon. The ultimate macro or close up lens that is able to magnify from 1x (real life size) to 5x. Features Focal length and maximum aperture: 65 mm f2.8 Lens construction: 10 elements in 8 groups Diagonal angle of view: 18°14” Focus adjustment: Manual Closest focusing distance: 0.243m 5X Filter size: 58mm What Canon says about the MP-E 65mm: A unique manual-focus lens designed exclusively for macro shooting This is the first macro photo lens designed to achieve a high magnification greater than 1x without additional accessories. It is ideal for small subjects. The newly designed optical formula and UD-glass elements suppress chromatic aberrations which become apparent at high magnifications. For flash photography, Macro Ring Lite ML-3 can be attached to the lens.   First try outs were difficult, but I was warned that this would not be an easy lens. So I need a lot of time to practise and do test shoots. As soon as I have some results I will share them here   On the left you see a picture of the lens in 1x and 5x magnification setting. In both extremes the lens acts completely different. So a new big adventure lies ahead.

Ever wondered how to make a macro photo? Ever wondered how they manage to take that beautiful photo of the scary insect? Ever wondered how to get close enough?   So did I, and therefore I started a quest to discover the wonders of close-up photography. And my journey is still going on. So for the time being you shouldn’t expect too much. But I just wanted to share the things that I have encountered. before you start trying to make macro or close-up photographs I think you should understand what the theory behind it is. The definition of close-up photography is that the image projected on the “film plane” (i.e film or a digital sensor) is close to the same size as the subject. In the last few years they have used the term ‘Macro’ for lenses that make it possible to show your subject in real size on the actual print, this only requires a magnification of 1:4. Most most lenses at the moment are able to get a magnification of 1:2. A real macro lens will get you a magnification of 1:1, which matches the definition of macro. When you have an all-round lens that has a macro setting you will be able to get close to your subject but the performance will be less. This means that the focus quality will be less then when you use a ‘real’ macro lens. Macro lenses come in different focal length. The longer the lens the further you can be from your subject while you still get the required magnification. So if you are only shooting stills you will more then happy with a short focal length. If you are trying to shoot a live object like insects it might be handy to use a longer focal length, so you can maintain more […]